Kenneth N. McKay

Kenneth N. McKay

Dr. Kenneth N. McKay is professor of production management and information systems in the Department of Management Sciences, Faculty of Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Since the mid 1980’s, he has been researching production control concepts, building scheduling systems, and consulting in the manufacturing sector. The focus of his work has been on commonsense manufacturing and the integration of human judgment with information technology in rapidly changing situations. He has also extensively researched the history of manufacturing management. In 1991 and 1998 he was a Visiting Scholar at M.I.T. with the Leaders For Manufacturing Program and is considered a leading expert in how ‘real’ factories run, and how to study the scheduling situation. With the assistance of Professors Thomas Morton and Gary Black, he has introduced the concept of Aversion Dynamics in mathematical formulations for scheduling and inventory control – a risk management concept inspired by industrial observations. Since the mid 1990’s he has collaborated extensively with Dr. Wiers on the human contribution to planning and scheduling. Recently, he has been working with Japanese colleagues in how to use value engineering concepts for designing supply chains, the use of information technology in small-­‐medium sized factories, and survival concepts for manufacturing management.

Manufacturing Excellence: Renewal and Rebirth

Manufacturing Excellence: Renewal and Rebirth
Print Price: 
$49.95
E-book Price: 
$29.95
In Stock Date: 
09/14/2015

Kenneth N. McKay and Vincent C.S. Wiers

Hello, I'm Jake, a retired production planner. I've been talking to my coffee mate Ben about the factory where I have spent the better part of my life. Believe me, I have seen things go well and even more go very wrong. I’m outside the gate now, but the grapevine is keeping me up to date. Which is why I know that the factory is heading into oblivion, as management does not seem to understand commonsense principles and they are testing the patience of their main customer. But wait, things look like they might change when new management is brought in.