Applied Science

Cellular Respiration

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$49.95
E-book Price: 
$29.95
In Stock Date: 
03/24/2016

A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher Paradise

What happens to a meal after it is eaten? Food consists primarily of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates (sugars). How do cells in the body process food once it is eaten and turned it into a form of energy that other cells can use? This book examines some of the classic experimental data that revealed how cells break down food to extract the energy. Metabolism of food is regulated so that energy extraction increases when needed and slows down when not needed. This type of self-regulation is all part of the complex web of enzymes that convert food into energy.

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Cellular Structure and Function

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$49.95
E-book Price: 
$29.95
In Stock Date: 
03/22/2016

A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher Paradise

All organisms are composed of cells, but what is the definition of a cell? Can size, shape or function be used to distinguish cells from non-living biological systems such as a virus? Whatever the definition of a cell is, it can probably be contradicted by cells with unusual characteristics. For example, there are cells as long as a giraffe’s neck while others are smaller than a mitochondrion. Sometimes it is hard to know the difference between an animal and a plant cell. Despite their diversity of shapes and sizes, cells are small—most of the time.

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Cellular Consequences of Evolution

Cellular Consequences of Evolution
Print Price: 
$49.95
E-book Price: 
$29.95
In Stock Date: 
03/24/2016

A. Malcolm Campbell, Christopher Paradise

Once the first cell arose on Earth, how did genetic diversity arise if DNA replication and cell division generate exact copies? The answer is that neither process is perfect and that changes do occur at each step. Some changes are small and subtle while others are large and dramatic. As DNA mutates, evolution of a population takes place. But when can someone determine if a single species has changed enough to be considered two separate species? How is a species defined and is this definition useful in the real world?

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